A New Portfolio

I recently returned from an amazing series of portfolio reviews in NYC where I spent the better part of a week sharing the new version of my portfolio with buyers, editors, and reps. Regular readers may have noticed over the past few months that I have made several mentions about the process of putting this new portfolio together alongside designer Nubby Twiglet in preparation for this marketing trip, and now I am ready to share the end results of our most recent collaboration with the above video and some photos of the final book.

Over many weeks of conceptual discussion, Nubby and I started to pull together the images and elements that would go into the book. We decided on an 11 x 14 landscape format, which is similar to previous versions of my book. I feel that it is a perfect size for the types of image layouts we ended up working with and avoids the transport and scale issues of larger books.

We also went with a completely custom solution for the covers rather than something pre-fabricated. It gave us so much more freedom in terms of our design and materials choices than working within the constraints and limited options offered by some off-the-shelf portfolio solutions. Nubby had worked with a bookbinder in Portland called Grossenbacher in the past and suggested them for the fabrication of the covers – they did not disappoint. The company has been around since 1925 and sports quite an impressive client list. They did a wonderful job with this project and the book itself became quite a conversation piece during several of my recent meetings because of its substantial artisanal feel.

Physical construction aside, we explored a few different versions of the body of the book, namely the image order and how it came together as a final whole body of work. Some layouts were built around various projects and assignments that I had shot, while others were built around a color story that progressed throughout the book, ending with a collection of my favorite black and white imagery. One of the most important decisions we made was whether or not to incorporate design elements other than just my photography into the main body of the book. Ultimately, we decided to take several elements from previous collaborations and incorporate them as a means of reinforcing the identity that we have built over the last few years, while giving the book a more finished and editorial feel – simple additions that I feel enhance the experience of the book.

Nubby also has some thoughts to share on the design process of the book.

When beginning work on Luke Copping’s portfolio, I wanted to leverage as many existing design elements from our previous collaborations as possible to keep the recognizability of his branding strong and consistent. After a few years of smaller collaborations, it was time to take on our most ambitious project to date: the print portfolio.

Luke already had a digital portfolio and even a magazine but the print portfolio was meant to be the most premium and tie everything else together. I designed the covers to mimic the look his letterpress business cards and had it produced at a local bookbinder with a silver foil wordmark and white foil cross pattern for a tonal effect. The covers are white linen with white lining and hidden screw posts. I wanted it to be as understated and premium as possible.

A lot of time was spent shuffling images into layouts that either revolved around a particular series or a color story. While the magazine had copy throughout, the portfolio was all about Luke’s photography so we kept the layouts in line with what you’d expect in a photography book. Big, beautiful and with a lot of white space when needed.

Luke’s book was printed at Pushdot here in Portland so I was able to proof it in person. He chose a premium matte paper with a slight texture that added a whole new dimension to his work. The prints and custom cover came together to form a book that we’re really proud of. I admire Luke for constantly pushing forward and investing in the presentation of his photography business — his passion for what he does really shows.

~ Nubby Twiglet

I could not be happier with the end result of this project. This new book is a culmination of a lot of new work and new approaches to how I want to present myself and my work moving forward. I hope you enjoy it. Feel free to leave your opinions and comments.

Cyberoptix Tie Lab 2012

Detroit based neckwear designer Cyberoptix Tie Lab commissioned me to create this series of images to promote their line of unique hand silkscreened neckties and scarves (my girlfriend is obsessed with their pashmina scarves). These are ties for rock stars and that aesthetic certainly shows up in this series. Cyberoptix is strongly rooted is responsible production ethics, especially in regards to the choices of ink they use to cut environmental and health impacts as well as their use of fair trade material in all of their silk products. I have shot for them in the past and I truly love how this company’s founder, Bethany Shorb, has brought together art and ethics to reinvigorate a classic accessory in a way that people genuinely get excited about – I am so thrilled when we have the chance to work together.

I am working an another campaign of images for Cyberoptix as we speak – a slightly more conceptual series that I’ll be sharing with you in a few weeks.

Here are a few behind the scenes mobile snaps of Logan from the day of the shoot. We felt that these ties lent themselves so well to rock-stardom that we started creating faux artwork for a nonexistent synth-punk project that Logan fronts in an alternate universe.

Small Town Girl

Nichole at Knox Farms

Nichole at Knox Farms

I spent a day photographing Nichole Linsay at two of the most scenic rural areas in Western NY – Boxler Farms and Knox Farms, near East Aurora NY.  Scouting the expansive property at Boxler Farms during the day in search of locations had us wading through the shallow  streams above a waterfall, trekking through fields of early spring wildflowers, and meeting many of the exotic animals that roam the property including camels, zebra, oryx, wildebeests, llamas, and emus. Later in the day we moved to shoot to the site of Knox Farms, which had previously been the famous estate of the wealthy Knox family before becoming a historic park. It is one of those perfect places that exists in its own little timeless bubble so distant from the encroaching suburbia just outside its gates.

Nichole with horse

The whole day was a distillation of so many of the things that I most love about being a photographer, and I am rarely happier than when a project becomes indistinguishable from an adventure.

Nichole in WNY stream

Required Reading 5.18.2012

Required Reading is a weekly listing of all the bits of visual inspiration, cool videos, news, hip links, and miscellaneous information that rattles my head during the week. The stuff that’s worth bookmarking and gets my brain-juices flowing.

Above: Yours truly, on set a few weeks back, trying to look serious with poor results. 


• This is what happens to innocent bystanders when you trust a photographer with an industrial strength wind canon.

• I really enjoyed Kathryn Shulz’s missive on being a night owl writer.  I think all creatives have had those desperate and explosive moments of creativity at 4:00 am, I know I have.

I re-read this a few times this week when things got hard, when I was trying to get some deadlines finished in spite of the fact that I should have been in bed resting and trying to recover from the nasty stomach virus I came down with this week ( Danielle LaPorte’s blog has become the first stop on my reading list ever since I picked up her book The Fire Starter Sessions)

• Is scientific curiosity part of our nature that leads to understanding and creativity? Is originality different in science vs art?

• What do  you do when you start to hate your own blog?

• And people complain about Photoshop now? dig into these before and afters from Pin-up paintings of the 1950’s.

• If you are going to play it safe it is time to quit.

• A very cool collection of vintage portraits of young royals in India over 50 years. 

 

Ways to Make A Mess

Off the plane from all the color and noise of Vegas and right into the studio for this beauty assignment – Clouds of pigment were flying during a fun session that found my subjects Holli and Hillary covered in color by the time they left – Holli liked the result so much that she decided to wear it home after the production wrapped.

Maybe it is all the bright lights and neon of Vegas having an affect on me, but I want to drown myself in color lately.

  Hillary Snyder with colorful face  

Models: Holli Arnold + Hillary Snyder

Makeup: Nicole Barry

Runway

Runway 5.0 final

Posters that were created for the BSC annual fashion event Runway – A showcase of student fashion design and textile arts. Erin Habes has done an amazing job producing this show year after year for some very talented students, often with the help of top minds in the fashion industry who donate their time to this event for the students. Each production tops the last in scope and ambition. Many of the students involved in the program were actually in studio during this shoot to observe the production of these images – so in addition to the styling/production team and talent it made for a crowded but fun set.

Runway 5.0 final

Special thanks to the team at Block Club for the poster design, all the students involved, the whole production team, and Erin Habes and Joseph Incao (Former Senior VP of Prada Retail Operations) for styling these images.

original images from the BSC Fashion Event posters

Papercut Magazine

papercut magazine lead image

Kyle Makrauer and I recently collaborated on an online feature for Papercut Magazine that delved deeper into Molly Hoeltke’s reclaimed fashion concept label Once Vintage – a design label I have shot with before. I very rarely find myself collaborating with another photographer in such a direct way as I did on this shoot, but Kyle and I wanted to try it as an experiment.

Below is a small gallery of my contribution to the project, you can see the rest of the images including those shot by Kyle on Papercut’s web feature.

Marie Vaccarello wearing Once Vintage collection

 

Dakotah Schickling

I made these images of Dakotah recently,  during a test session on what coincidentally happened to be her birthday.  Dakotah and I have had many near misses on assignments prior to this – often coming very close to working together but never quite being in the same place at the same time due to scheduling differences. It took our mutual friend/stylist Nicole Barry to finally introduce us in person last month and make arrangements for this Happy Birthday shoot to happen.

  

 

Lauren Ashley Rogers' Winning Runway Collection

Marie Cover

lauren ashley rogers header

A few months ago Lauren Ashley Rogers was named as the winner in Buffalo State College’s annual runway showcase and competition, Runway 4.0, an event headed by my friend Erin Habes. As part of the winner’s prize package, Erin and I collaborated to develop a series of images for the young designer that she can use as she moves forward with her education and career. I am so happy to be able to help a young local student and designer who is working in this new fashion-conscious culture that Buffalo seems to be developing, thanks in great part to people like Erin Habes. Here are a few images from her collection,

Lydia Dominick wearing Lauren Ashley Rogers

“Roger’s spring collection wrangles the chaotic energy of the world with a simplistic approach to neutral color blocking, framed nicely with dark swipes of black, grey and snow leopard print. The intense shades feel fresh once again.” ~ Erin Habes 

Marie wearing Lauren Ashley Rogers

“The photo shoot was a huge success and a brilliant collaboration of creative talent, Buffalo State College and myself are so grateful to Luke for giving a young designer the opportunity to learn and absorb a wealth of experience through the building of her lookbook.”  ~ Erin Habes 

Marie Wearing Lauren Ashley Rogers

My Mini Vacation

my-mini-vacation-toronto

my-mini-vacation-title

Never underestimate the effect that twenty-four hours can have on your outlook and attitude. After a grueling week a sudden decision was made by me and my girlfriend Erin to jet up to Toronto for an overnight respite from our respective work. Being that we are both freelancers who have schedules that can be difficult to synch these mini vacations and day adventures become more common diversions for us than long overly planned vacations, we are just up for a good spontaneous adventure. Armed only with my iPhone we left on friday afternoon to de-stress, have fun, and go on a short notice adventure before returning to Buffalo and jumping right back into a busy week before opening the new studio. I feel recharged, renewed, and am bursting with new ideas from such a short trip. I sometimes forget how important it can be to just step away for a few minutes, especially during times when I am juggling many projects, both personal and professional.

my-mini-vacation-boat

Driving down the QEW from Buffalo to Toronto and other destinations north, I have always been fascinated by this replica of Jacques Cartier’s Grand Hermie that has been sitting in the water just off the highway for years. It used to be more substantial, but the main hull of the ship has been reduced by rust and fire to little more than a shell, still, the masts rising up over the tree line have long served as a marker for those making frequent trips back and forth from Toronto to Buffalo like we do. I even used to use it a location for some more unorthodox engagement and bridal shoots  back when I regularly shot weddings. It is one of those great roadside quirks can easily spark imagination.

The last leg of the trip, coming into downtown Toronto, is the point where I could feel like our mini-vacation had truly arrived. Some of the quick hit highlights of the trip follow:

• Checking into the hotel and standing in what felt like the longest check in line in history (Note to all – always a good idea to not check in at the same time that two entire conventions worth of people in town that weekend are trying to do the same)

• Walking, and just being out in the open air, wandering the streets, taking pictures, and laughing our asses off at inside jokes just melted away weeks of over-focus and living by a schedule. This is where I re-centered myself the most.

• Taking tons of pictures of me and Erin at her request ( The dreaded mirror shot, everyone loves/hates them, but I will acknowledge how much fun they can be)

• Spending time with my cousin Ryan on our second day there (an older photo above that I took of him a few years back, one of my favorites)

• The food!!! Toronto in always a gastronomic wonderland for us, we have our favorites we always like to drop in on, but are always looking for new spots to get great food and hang out. Toronto has some of the best Indian food I have ever eaten, so friday night we managed to drop by a restaurant close to our hotel for a very late and very relaxing meal. Saturday on the other hand, was all about sitting out in the sun and taking in a long… long lunch. My cousin took us to a Portuguese restaurant with an amazing patio where we spent most of the afternoon drinking beer, eating whole grilled sardines, sausages, great bread, and the most delicious grilled chicken.

Even just one day away from in a different place, a brief change of scenery at best, can be an amazing change for your outlook. Get out there and just go somewhere… anywhere. Even if it is just for a few hours, go have an adventure, eat at the restaurant you always wanted to, get in your car and drive for an hour in any direction, then spend 2 more hours just walking around and exploring where you arrive at, the destination doesn’t really matter, it’s about making the choice to break your routine and just go. Take that same thought process and apply it to the project or image you have been thinking about creating. Just get out there are do it!

Coming Soon

The studio is almost done. We will be holding our opening reception this week, As the image above illustrates – I am sure that Scott will be glad to be finished with the painting.


We have finished the final retouching and post-production on the project for Anatomy, and you can expect to see the finished images in just a week or two.

Required Reading 7.8.2011 – Extra Pretty

Washing paintbrushes at victory studios

Washing paintbrushes at victory studios

Required Reading is a weekly listing of all the bits of visual inspiration, cool videos, news, hip links, and miscellaneous information that rattles my head during the week. The stuff that’s worth bookmarking and gets my brain-juices flowing.

Back from both the holiday weekend and several days of feeling under the weather, but I did manage to get up to some illness related adventures and catch up on quite a bit of work while I was convalescing. We are about a week from opening the new studio and could not be more excited, we can finally say goodbye to the ever-present paintbrush (especially the one above… it’s cursed I tell you) that seemed to magically appear in my hand every time I reached for my camera.

And, as you may have noticed, I have been quite busy revamping and updating the blog over to a new look, one that I feel presents my visual content a little better than the old layout. This is just stage one of a few more planned updates I have slated for the next few months.

• An ever-growing photography tumblr centered around the idea of vintage photography of men – My Daguerreotype Boyfriend

• Warren Ellis’ espousing the importance of an analog notebook,  I keep uncovering more and more creatives I respect who share this outlook on the value of a simple pen and paper.

• Great piece for young and upcoming photographers over at Chase Jarvis’ blog, Yes is for wimps, get used to hearing no, is the perfect rundown on how “no” may end up being your very best friend in this crazy business.

Fashion Gone Rogue is featuring an editorial from Amanda Pratt for Karen #12 that I am just madly in love with.

Blk - Black bottled water

• I have a new obsession with this water I found in the natural foods section of the store while I was sick and looking for vitamins to chase the germs away. I can only describe Blk as the gothest water ever made, the bottle itself is clear… clear and most likely filled with the opaque and refreshing essence of darkness….

Agenda, my new calendar app of choice

• Oh, how I love this new video by the Horrors for Still Life, directed by Oliver Murray

• As an old analog Holga enthusiast, I am really fascinated by the possibility of a digital Holga-D, especially as an innovative open source camera platform.

• On the hunt for some new mixes and work music? I strongly suggest that you stop by the Illuminated Mixtapes for hours of sonic pleasure.

• Been perusing ffffound.com a lot lately on the recommendation of my assistant, Jason (above). Been using it as sort of a quick hit visual research and inspiration clearing house, I log on for five minutes here and there just to click around and see what I come across.

• An important and insightful entry from the inimitable Nubby Twiglet about the importance of starting your journey now and doing what you know you are meant to do.

• Australian fashion label Ksubi presents this short film by Daniel Askill, apparently to reintroduce their colored denim line… and make me re-watch it ten times in a row, this is definitely the one video piece I have not been able to stop watching all week

Beth and Jason's Engagement Party

Dungaree Dolly and Jason's Engagement Photos

My friends Beth (from dungareedolly.com) and Jason (from the Royal Crowns) had their amazing engagement party over the weekend and I got a chance to take this über adorable engagement photograph of them as an engagement gift that really shows off this wonderful couple’s unique style. Congratulations you two!

Required Reading

• A beautiful flickr gallery of Tokyo cabs at night. All sleek metal, glass, plastic, and light, zipping through the neon drenched night.

• Evidence that a cool trailer can sell anything. Solitaire has never looked so fun or relevant as it does here.

• Gala Darling shares 10 of the most important ideas you will ever here on the topic of being happy as an artist. Simple, concise, to the point, and most importantly, true.

• A little bit of time that will definitely not be wasted. 14 powerful TED talks by photographers.

• the 99% echoes my longstanding belief in using analog rituals and methods to increase focus and become more productive.

• Having a tough time sticking with your blog? feel demoralized? go read this great guest article over on problogger.

• Chase Jarvis’ new short film, Benevolent Mischief, is just plain awesome. Watch it and then go make something of your own.

• Great interview with photographer and blogger Andrew Hetherington

• logodesignlove.com’s post on how to find success as a self-employed designer has some great tips that can be translated into the experiences of photographers as well.

4 Solutions for 99 Excuses

Recently The 99% (one of my favorite websites about creativity, idea implementation, and work philosophy) featured an article based on a readers’ poll about the 99 most commonly used excuses people let stand in the way of their ideas taking shape. While thought provoking, their main intention was to get people to face the facts of how harmful excuses can be to the creative process, and to show just how widespread their debilitating influence can be.  There are, however, some points from their top fifteen excuses that I think bear a more in-depth analysis, especially in relation the photographers and other freelancers.

1. I Don’t Have Enough Time

Where do your passions lay? At what point do we sacrifice love of what we do and the ability to bring our visions to fruition? The simple fact of the matter is that if doing something is important enough to you, you can and will find time to do it. There are different ways to tackle this problem. Some like to accomplish tasks in preset modules, breaking down large projects that can seem insurmountable into hour-long task and goal blocks that they schedule into their regular days. Others prefer the marathon approach (this was my modus operandi for years). I would finish an 8-10 hour day at my day job, excitedly knowing that the rest of my night was dedicated to photography and creative tasks, either a shoot or web development or retouching. I would complete my daily tasks and dedicate the rest of my time to taking pictures and post-production because it is what I loved to do. It was a decision I made to consciously create time for my passions. A lot of the tasks I completed using this system ended up laying the groundwork for my eventual transition back to photography as a business.

The 99% suggests taking a proactive approach to task management and identifying important tasks as great first steps. I would have to agree. In terms of real world implementation, one of the easiest things you can do is to get yourself a good task management system that synchs across a variety of devices. I am partial to Things, which has been a huge boon to my productivity, especially since it works on both my desktop and mobile system. A great alternative to Things is Remember the Milk, which is a web-based application pretty much accessible from anywhere. The real key to these programs is how you dedicate yourself to using them. I start each day with a daily review of tasks, ranking and ordering them in a way that offers me the best productivity stream. I identify what can be accomplished and what cannot that day based on my workflow and I make sure that I block out a solid chunk of time each day that is dedicated to nothing but personal projects. Treat these personal work blocks like any other task in your workflow. They must be completed and used effectively, but you will find that if you schedule them alongside  your billable hours and private tasks that you will absolutely be able to make time for them.

Two other sites I recommend checking out that are related to time management and workflow are:

http://five.sentenc.es/

http://www.43folders.com/

In the end, it comes down to this – if you love it, do it! If you have responsibilities, take care of them, then do it! If you are tired, wake up and do it! The musician Henry Rollins is a great example of this. Rollins has been known to work so prolifically and for such long periods of time while maintaining a hectic travel schedule that he often sleeps only a few hours a night. This is a great example of dedication and work ethic leading to success.

2. I’m Afraid Of Failure

Failure is one of the most singularly useful tools in the world to motivate you to improve. If you have never failed then you have nothing to illustrate what mistakes you have made in the past. Experimentation is a big part of this. Always give yourself the ability to play with your work. Try new things in your personal work and learn from the mistakes and successes to create a better product in your professional work. With client jobs, once you have the safety shots and have met the layout requirements that have been set forth, try to take a few more daring images. Oftentimes you will fail, but you will occasionally have a brilliant success as well. Perfection and a 100% success rate are admirable notions, but rarely achievable. It’s far more important, in reality, to strive for a perfection you will never reach. This will have many more benefits for you in the long run. There is no such thing as a perfect photograph. Even the best can improve upon what they have already done. If you never risk failure and play it safe constantly you will find that yourself and others will start to view you as competently and consistently average. They won’t really have anything bad to say about your work, nor will they have the impetus to hire you for your singular vision and style. For more reading on the topic of learning from mistakes and letting them improve you, check out It’s OK to Suck.

7. I Am Afraid of the Competition

Competition is nothing more than fuel and fallacy mixed together. This issue can be addressed from two angles. The first is that competition is a fantastic catalyst to get better. We must all strive to constantly be growing as artists, improving our skills, outlooks, and attitudes in the long run to provide our clients with the best us we can be. If you can sit comfortably at the top of the hill with no one else trying to summit it, it’s very easy to become complacent and lazy and you will find yourself only doing as much necessary to maintain the status quo. However, when someone becomes competition to you, it can light an ever-needed fire under your ass and push you to start doing all the things you should be doing: marketing more, improving technical skills, reviewing your fundamentals, improving your negotiating tactics, and pushing you to pursue more personal projects to develop your vision further.

The second angle to view this from is that much of what we do is selling ourselves just as much as we sell our services to our clients. You are your own niche, your own brand, and your work can easily follow suit. Once again, this comes back to competing on more than just price. Demonstrate beyond argument the value that you can bring to your clients’ projects and how you can build positive working relationships with their teams. You should be so desirable to work with that the only issue you feel you have to compete with is whether your unique style is the right one for the job. In summation, let competition push you to a point where you are bettered in all aspects because of it.

8. I Got My Expectations Too High Just Thinking About It

This can be a dangerous problem, both from a financial and spiritual side. I was once acquainted with a photographer who suffered from the problem of generating fantastic ideas rapidly, so rapidly, in fact, that it became a problem. Firstly, they had a serious issue with bringing any idea to final fruition. Projects would be half completed and strewn aside. It’s quite detrimental to put a lot of capital into a personal project and walk away with nothing to show for it, not because of difficulty, but merely because the excitement brought on by new ideas forced them to lose interest in seeing their original idea through. Secondly, when ideas were completed they had often become an pale imitation of their original selves. New ideas would impinge upon the basic purity of the original concept, things would be added and stuck on at a whim. The result, needless to say, was often disappointing and chaotic. Many people suffer from this and similar issues when seeing their projects  through. Some people are exceptionally good at generating ideas. They find it exciting. But once they realize that actual hard work is involved, they often lose their enthusiasm. Others, much like the photographer above, suffer from a lack of faith in their ideas, always feeling that they are on shaky ground and that they need to slap more “idea plaster” on to keep them stable, when in reality it’s making their  idea more and more structurally unsound.

Be picky about your projects. Conceptualize and plan them well and break them down into smaller and more achievable segments. Having ambition is great, and an absolutely required trait in this profession. But if you cannot make a plan to realize your ambition, then it becomes  more and more of a seemingly impossible goal. The situations mentioned in the paragraph above can easily be rectified through even the most basic planing, and then having the dedication to stick to the core details of the plan. Do not let this lead you to think that improvisation cannot be a part of a well-planned production though. Improvisation and adaptation will be your constant allies and companions. In fact, having the forethought to plan a project carefully is what will give you the freedom to improvise more effectively.

Required Reading – Back from Holiday

Back from a short but relaxing holiday in a self imposed exile from work, emails, and doing anything that wasn’t relaxing or fun. 3 days spent with my girlfriend eating barbecue, hitting some bars, and visiting family. The weekend culminated last night when we spent the evening together exploring one of Buffalo’s most beautiful waterfront parks. It’s the first time I have walked the entire length of the grounds, and found a few treasures. The first is a huge concrete slab that served as the foundation/parking lot of a former outdoor mega club. The slab is slowly being reclaimed by nature, cracking and splitting with strong plantlife coming up through the fissures.  The next was several huge blocks of white marble of granite (I couldn’t tell) laid out in a pile and nestled up in the shadow of a small green hill. It seems alien for them to be laying there in the middle of such an empty space, these cyclopean blocks of stone that just seemed so out of place, but they were laid out so beautifully. The evening ended with us eating some of Buffalo’s finest tacos. and then early to bed for me so that I could get up for an ASMP breakfast.

Heres some links that I cultivated over the weekend for you.

Luke Copping - Walking away

• The phone call is a dying art in some circles, but its still one oft he finest marketing tools around. Leslie Burns thinks so too. and her opinion is one I trust.

• Clever use of Google AdWords nets a creative a wish list job.

• Richard Branson, long touted for being a publicity hounds, says that entrepreneurs need to build for the future, and that  sometimes showy projects and stunts can be calculated experiments in disguise, not grabs for the headlines. Here are his five tips to running a successful business.

• From Ryan Freitas – 35 Lessons in 35 years

• Take your freelancing to the next level. become a thought leader and exercise some smart control and influence over your fans.

Erin McPartlan

Quick Cuts – Vaunt

Vaunt

Vaunt was in town briefly for a shoot with Auxiliary Magazine. I was glad to have a chance, albeit in an extremely limited window of time, to work with her in the few scant minutes of light we had left. It was a simple casual and fun shoot which resulted in a very rewarding image.

Sarah Shriver and Bryan Vomit

Sarah Shriver and Bryan Vomit

I am coming off the tail end of an extremely prolific week of shooting, ill be leaking a ton of new images out here on the blog over the next few weeks. I spent friday out and about with Zach Rose photographing the awesome alternative style icons Bryan Vomit and Sarah Shriver. An absolutely fun and heavy metal fueled shoot that left them covered in the styling secrets of the week: food coloring and cornstarch. These two were just a blast to shoot with, I can’t wait to work with them again. I loved working with such extreme styling in such a natural environment, creating an interesting juxtaposition that highlights their unique looks.

Bryan Vomit

Sarah Shriver