Victory Studios Grand Opening

Scott Gable of Victory Studios
Photo: Aaron Ingrao

Victory Studios Opening Header

Last week Aaron Ingrao, Scott Gable, And Myself opened our new workspace, Victory Studios, alongside some of our closest friends, clients, relatives, and other creatives. Even the good folks at Vitamin Water got involved and donated some beverages for the party.  Here are some images from our opening party.

The three photographers of Victory!!! From left to right: Scott Gable, Aaron Ingrao, and Myself.

My assistant Jason’s son Liam, who became the unofficial mascot of the opening.

Local photographer Jerry Seawood has been spending quite a bit of time on the other side of the camera lately, most notably as a key image in my Pigment series.

 

Clients and friends: Anatomy owner/designer Ali Eagen, and style writer/educator/advocate Erin Habes

Photo: Aaron Ingrao

Dj Lo Pro took care of the entertainment for the evening.

Photo: Aaron Ingrao
Photo: Aaron Ingrao

A better view of the whole space….

….Which we are pretty proud of, considering the space was a disaster zone just a few months before when we began our renovations,

My girlfriend Erin and my assistant’s wife; Tracie

Tracie, Liam, And Jason

Victory Studios Logo

The Victory Logo

 Photo: Aaron Ingrao
Photo: Aaron Ingrao

 Lisa Ellen Cooper and Lindsay DeDario

Scott and his family

 

 Dj Lo Pro

 As the sun goes down party goers were treated to one of the best views of the city.

Aaron and his father.

Jason Stoos

 Cooling down on the roof.

Photo: Aaron Ingrao

 As the night went on our photo ideas became more and more ambitious.

There is something wrong with us…

We are quite excited to finally be opening and hosting commercial clients in the new space. Keep your eyes open for upcoming educational and arts events we will be hosting there in the coming months as well.

Quick Cuts: Making Use of Downtime

While working on a busy production I had some downtime with Model Kate O’Connor and stylist Andrea Lossecco to create a series of images for a personal project I am working on. Sometimes, the logistics of a project leave you with opportunities like this, where you just need to take advantage of your surroundings and time to get out there and shoot something for yourself.

Jessica Jean

A few outtakes from yesterday’s shoot with Jessica Jean. I had seen this pile of marble from the roadway a while back, and taken a few pictures of it while out walking dogs, but I had wanted to use it in a major project for some time. Jessica was out with us on this assignment and the final series will be coming soon, but here are some outtakes and a preview in the meantime.

Jessica Jean outtake

Adjusting wardrobe

Mr. Chops decided to visit the set today

Walking over rocky terrain in a skirt like that can be precarious at best.

The pile of slabs.

Jessica Jean

The first finished preview. This will be quite the series when its complete, so stay tuned.

Work Music – Instrumental Bliss

This week I find that I have been avoiding too much music with a lyrical base. I have been able to focus much better with instrumental tracks playing. I am working on some projects that require a deft and subtle hand in post production, and I find the more subdued tracks keeps my hand a little calmer. There are definitely some great treasures on this list, most notably Red Sparowes, a band that has long been in my constant play rotation. Its both driving and relaxing, works fantastic for both computer work and in studio when shooting. Bohren and Der Club of Gore is another group worth checking out for those who find themselves doing a ton of work on the road on their laptop. Cool, dark, and moody jazz inspired tracks that can be pretty much adapted and listened to in any situation. They are very theatrical as well, fantastic personal soundtrack music.

Get a playlist! Standalone player Get Ringtones

4 Solutions for 99 Excuses

Recently The 99% (one of my favorite websites about creativity, idea implementation, and work philosophy) featured an article based on a readers’ poll about the 99 most commonly used excuses people let stand in the way of their ideas taking shape. While thought provoking, their main intention was to get people to face the facts of how harmful excuses can be to the creative process, and to show just how widespread their debilitating influence can be.  There are, however, some points from their top fifteen excuses that I think bear a more in-depth analysis, especially in relation the photographers and other freelancers.

1. I Don’t Have Enough Time

Where do your passions lay? At what point do we sacrifice love of what we do and the ability to bring our visions to fruition? The simple fact of the matter is that if doing something is important enough to you, you can and will find time to do it. There are different ways to tackle this problem. Some like to accomplish tasks in preset modules, breaking down large projects that can seem insurmountable into hour-long task and goal blocks that they schedule into their regular days. Others prefer the marathon approach (this was my modus operandi for years). I would finish an 8-10 hour day at my day job, excitedly knowing that the rest of my night was dedicated to photography and creative tasks, either a shoot or web development or retouching. I would complete my daily tasks and dedicate the rest of my time to taking pictures and post-production because it is what I loved to do. It was a decision I made to consciously create time for my passions. A lot of the tasks I completed using this system ended up laying the groundwork for my eventual transition back to photography as a business.

The 99% suggests taking a proactive approach to task management and identifying important tasks as great first steps. I would have to agree. In terms of real world implementation, one of the easiest things you can do is to get yourself a good task management system that synchs across a variety of devices. I am partial to Things, which has been a huge boon to my productivity, especially since it works on both my desktop and mobile system. A great alternative to Things is Remember the Milk, which is a web-based application pretty much accessible from anywhere. The real key to these programs is how you dedicate yourself to using them. I start each day with a daily review of tasks, ranking and ordering them in a way that offers me the best productivity stream. I identify what can be accomplished and what cannot that day based on my workflow and I make sure that I block out a solid chunk of time each day that is dedicated to nothing but personal projects. Treat these personal work blocks like any other task in your workflow. They must be completed and used effectively, but you will find that if you schedule them alongside  your billable hours and private tasks that you will absolutely be able to make time for them.

Two other sites I recommend checking out that are related to time management and workflow are:

http://five.sentenc.es/

http://www.43folders.com/

In the end, it comes down to this – if you love it, do it! If you have responsibilities, take care of them, then do it! If you are tired, wake up and do it! The musician Henry Rollins is a great example of this. Rollins has been known to work so prolifically and for such long periods of time while maintaining a hectic travel schedule that he often sleeps only a few hours a night. This is a great example of dedication and work ethic leading to success.

2. I’m Afraid Of Failure

Failure is one of the most singularly useful tools in the world to motivate you to improve. If you have never failed then you have nothing to illustrate what mistakes you have made in the past. Experimentation is a big part of this. Always give yourself the ability to play with your work. Try new things in your personal work and learn from the mistakes and successes to create a better product in your professional work. With client jobs, once you have the safety shots and have met the layout requirements that have been set forth, try to take a few more daring images. Oftentimes you will fail, but you will occasionally have a brilliant success as well. Perfection and a 100% success rate are admirable notions, but rarely achievable. It’s far more important, in reality, to strive for a perfection you will never reach. This will have many more benefits for you in the long run. There is no such thing as a perfect photograph. Even the best can improve upon what they have already done. If you never risk failure and play it safe constantly you will find that yourself and others will start to view you as competently and consistently average. They won’t really have anything bad to say about your work, nor will they have the impetus to hire you for your singular vision and style. For more reading on the topic of learning from mistakes and letting them improve you, check out It’s OK to Suck.

7. I Am Afraid of the Competition

Competition is nothing more than fuel and fallacy mixed together. This issue can be addressed from two angles. The first is that competition is a fantastic catalyst to get better. We must all strive to constantly be growing as artists, improving our skills, outlooks, and attitudes in the long run to provide our clients with the best us we can be. If you can sit comfortably at the top of the hill with no one else trying to summit it, it’s very easy to become complacent and lazy and you will find yourself only doing as much necessary to maintain the status quo. However, when someone becomes competition to you, it can light an ever-needed fire under your ass and push you to start doing all the things you should be doing: marketing more, improving technical skills, reviewing your fundamentals, improving your negotiating tactics, and pushing you to pursue more personal projects to develop your vision further.

The second angle to view this from is that much of what we do is selling ourselves just as much as we sell our services to our clients. You are your own niche, your own brand, and your work can easily follow suit. Once again, this comes back to competing on more than just price. Demonstrate beyond argument the value that you can bring to your clients’ projects and how you can build positive working relationships with their teams. You should be so desirable to work with that the only issue you feel you have to compete with is whether your unique style is the right one for the job. In summation, let competition push you to a point where you are bettered in all aspects because of it.

8. I Got My Expectations Too High Just Thinking About It

This can be a dangerous problem, both from a financial and spiritual side. I was once acquainted with a photographer who suffered from the problem of generating fantastic ideas rapidly, so rapidly, in fact, that it became a problem. Firstly, they had a serious issue with bringing any idea to final fruition. Projects would be half completed and strewn aside. It’s quite detrimental to put a lot of capital into a personal project and walk away with nothing to show for it, not because of difficulty, but merely because the excitement brought on by new ideas forced them to lose interest in seeing their original idea through. Secondly, when ideas were completed they had often become an pale imitation of their original selves. New ideas would impinge upon the basic purity of the original concept, things would be added and stuck on at a whim. The result, needless to say, was often disappointing and chaotic. Many people suffer from this and similar issues when seeing their projects  through. Some people are exceptionally good at generating ideas. They find it exciting. But once they realize that actual hard work is involved, they often lose their enthusiasm. Others, much like the photographer above, suffer from a lack of faith in their ideas, always feeling that they are on shaky ground and that they need to slap more “idea plaster” on to keep them stable, when in reality it’s making their  idea more and more structurally unsound.

Be picky about your projects. Conceptualize and plan them well and break them down into smaller and more achievable segments. Having ambition is great, and an absolutely required trait in this profession. But if you cannot make a plan to realize your ambition, then it becomes  more and more of a seemingly impossible goal. The situations mentioned in the paragraph above can easily be rectified through even the most basic planing, and then having the dedication to stick to the core details of the plan. Do not let this lead you to think that improvisation cannot be a part of a well-planned production though. Improvisation and adaptation will be your constant allies and companions. In fact, having the forethought to plan a project carefully is what will give you the freedom to improvise more effectively.

Negativity as a Virus and Four Ideas on How to Treat It

It has become a sad trend. Negativity is sweeping through the photography community at a growing and alarming rate, both online in forums and blogs, and on an interpersonal level at industry events and gatherings. More and more photographers are starting to drown in an ocean of self-loathing, scapegoating, fear, blame, and complacent laziness. It’s a self-propagating problem. Negativity spreads like a disease; to other photographers, to our clients, to our fans, and to the viewing public.

When I started out in this business I would occasionally run into people in the industry who would take one look at me, a student coming out of school and into the business, and would take me aside and attempt to discourage me from pursuing photography as a career. It was not a rare thing to hear “Don’t get into photography, it’s a dying business.”  I could never discern their individual motives. Were they taking turbulence in the industry hard, fearing the end of their career and livelihood and projecting it  on to others? Did they view new emerging photographers as a threat to their market? Had they stopped evolving as artists and creatives, blaming the changing wants and aesthetic needs of the industry for their own unwillingness to break set habits and move into new creative territories? Whatever the reason, some people are just not aware of how this can affect other people. I am sad to say that it affected me. After a few year of hearing this, I really started to doubt having any future in this business at all. I was convinced that the photography industry was on its last legs and that any attempt to move forward in it was hopeless. In fact, I even left the photography industry for some time to work for a manufacturing firm. It took years for me to realize just how strong my want to be a photographer  really was. Thankfully, I was able to make the move back into photography as a career. And while it is a tough and extremely competitive business, I find myself much happier, more excited about work, and generally more positive than I have been in years.

Rather than telling someone this, we should encourage emerging photographers more, both to excel in their work as well as to learn proper business acumen so that they can enter the world more prepared to work in this industry. Competition is a glorious thing, and while I can understand the motivations that create the fear of already small markets becoming more saturated that some photographers seem to exhibit, I do not agree with it. It’s a much more positive action to foster creativity in others, to push them to grow as artists. Their growing skill and success should push you to improve your own work and business skills to stay competitive. We can never become complacent or lazy. If we stagnate as artists (and indeed in this day and age we are artists and not merely technicians) then can we really blame an industry’s fickle tastes and rapidly evolving aesthetics for moving past us quickly?

Another common complaint I hear that saddens me is the claim that “The industry does not respect photographers anymore”. If you want people to respect what you do, give them something to respect you for. Complaining to others about the changes in the industry is pointless. Complaining accomplishes nothing at all. It’s a waste of energy that could be better spent creating new work to make clients respect you for the value you bring to their projects. Time better spent marketing to clients on a personal level, impressing them with the enthusiasm and energy that you can bring to their accounts, selling not just your work, but yourself to them. This seems to be an idea that has escaped a lot of photographers. Yes, the business has changed, and we must change with it. Not in terms of compromising our business ethics. One should always stick to their guns in terms of the policies that they have set forth to run their business, but rather we should find new ways to adapt these business practices to meet the needs of changing business climate. We must examine and experiment with new business and pricing models to work with clients and not for them or in some extremely negative scenarios, against them. We should be creating new bodies of intelligent work that reminds our clients of our talents, skills, and abilities, demonstrating value beyond mere technical skill or pricing. You cannot demand respect. It must be earned, and the best way to do this is by demonstrating consistent and ambitious value to the people you want to respect you.

It seems that so many resort to negativity because it is the path of least resistance. It is so much easier to spend our time focusing on the negative aspects of our life and business than it is to proactively do something positive to improve our work. It’s always easier to blame someone else for change than ourselves for our own difficulties in adapting. Sadly, I have even been witness to photographers, both experienced and inexperienced, complaining to potential clients on their blogs and even in person about the changes in the industry and about the difficulty of making a living in an extremely competitive climate. In many ways this is more harmful to our business than any industry-wide changes could ever be, It makes us appear as falsely entitled, spoiled, and bummed out children. Why would any client, anywhere, want to deal with someone who does nothing but bring a sense of doom to what they do? Negativity breeds more negativity, and it’s becoming a vicious cycle that is sucking more and more photographers in. Nothing bums me out more than seeing a group of photographers gathered at an industry event, spending their time complaining to each other, all the while oblivious to the fact that they were surrounded by potential clients whom they could be setting up meetings with.

Thankfully, there are some things that I have found that help me avoid falling into this trap, and even help others to combat it on occasion.

Encourage Others to Excel

Learning by teaching can be a fantastic tool. It can help us come to realizations about ourselves and our own work that we may not have arrived at independently. If you see someone exhibiting such negative behavior, do your best to help them overcome it. Be available to offer suggestions and answer questions. You might be surprised at how listening to someone else’s problems can help you find ways to solve your own. Listening is a lost skill, just be careful not to become a constant sounding board for the terminally negative. You’ll find yourself getting dragged down faster than you know.  Encouraging others to excel also fosters a wonderful sense of competition. The better the people around us, the harder we have to push ourselves to improve and succeed. It’s easy to walk to the top of a hill, but its much more rewarding and beneficial to summit a mountain.

Surround Yourself with Intelligent and Positive Influences

Not just in your personal life, but in your business life as well. A great attitude can go a long way and can improve the mood and outlook of others as well. One of the most helpful things I had ever done for my business was to put together an extremely skilled and supporting group of peers, crew, and mentors. People who gave intelligent and positive advice that pushed me to excel and make intelligent decisions. For instance, a few months ago I decided that I wanted to start working with an experienced and knowledgeable consultant that could offer an objective opinion of my body of work and help me develop a more cohesive marketing program. I eventually decided to work with Amanda Sosa Stone, not only because of her excellent track record and insight, but because her enthusiasm for what she does and for what I am doing is utterly infectious. In my early conversations with her I would find myself giddy with excitement to implement her ideas and advice, even more so when they began to have positive tangible effects.

Another great example is Nubby Twiglet, the designer who developed my visual identity. I have become a daily reader of Nubby’s blog since I started working with her. Her writings have become extremely influential to me and the way I think about my business, my work, and how I am a major part of my brand. Blog posts like this and this have stayed with me long after I originally read them and I have found myself revisiting them periodically. I had the pleasure of interviewing Nubby on this blog a few months back with the goal of helping photographers who were looking to work with a graphic designer for the first time and it was an insightful and stirring source of information.

Never Stop Learning

Stagnation is a terrible thing. We have to strive to never stop learning and gaining new knowledge to avoid it. This is a wide-reaching topic that can cover many areas of your life. In the arena of business, read blogs from forward thinkers in the subjects of marketing and sales. In photography, experiment more and push yourself beyond your comfort zone. Shoot more personal work without thought to end use, but rather because you enjoy the act and craft of it Take pictures and build projects around things that matter to you, that you connect with on a deep and personal level. Read more, you would be surprised at how much a good book can get your mind working. Watch films that inspire you and seek influence from your other creative outlets and passions to feed back into your photography. Read self-help books like Steven Pressfield’s The War of Art which can help you combat your own internal resistance and creative fears. Never be afraid to ask questions of others and to learn from people both more and less experienced from you.

Get Good — Really Good

There is no quicker road to negativity than mediocrity and the downward pull of inertia dragging your attitude down. An object at rest wants to stay at rest. Beat this by pushing yourself to grow. Just finished a project you are exceptionally proud of? That’s great, now get out there and try to create something even better. You will find yourself more excited to create new work when you challenge yourself. You will learn from the mistakes you made in the past and actively improve on them, rather than repeating them over and over. One of my favorite quotes on this subject, ever, comes from Steve Martin.

Be undeniably good. When people ask me how do you make it in show business or whatever, what I always tell them and nobody ever takes note of it ‘cuz it’s not the answer they wanted to hear — what they want to hear is here’s how you get an agent, here’s how you write a script, here’s how you do this — but I always say, “Be so good they can’t ignore you.” If somebody’s thinking, “How can I be really good?”, people are going to come to you. It’s much easier doing it that way than going to cocktail parties.

Take this to heart. Get better and better until you cannot be ignored anymore. Strive to be so undeniably good at what you do that people will have no choice other than to pay attention, Add value to this by being the type of person that others want to work with, one who makes the people around them more excited to create something wonderful. Bring enthusiasm to everything you do and strive to deliver more than what is asked of you. Don’t be afraid to put your work our there for others to see, whatever your own doubts or negative feelings might be. No one can notice you if you hide in the shadows. Do not ever be afraid to (as photography consultant Leslie Burns puts it in her book) “Tell The World you Don’t Suck

Required Reading – Back from Holiday

Back from a short but relaxing holiday in a self imposed exile from work, emails, and doing anything that wasn’t relaxing or fun. 3 days spent with my girlfriend eating barbecue, hitting some bars, and visiting family. The weekend culminated last night when we spent the evening together exploring one of Buffalo’s most beautiful waterfront parks. It’s the first time I have walked the entire length of the grounds, and found a few treasures. The first is a huge concrete slab that served as the foundation/parking lot of a former outdoor mega club. The slab is slowly being reclaimed by nature, cracking and splitting with strong plantlife coming up through the fissures.  The next was several huge blocks of white marble of granite (I couldn’t tell) laid out in a pile and nestled up in the shadow of a small green hill. It seems alien for them to be laying there in the middle of such an empty space, these cyclopean blocks of stone that just seemed so out of place, but they were laid out so beautifully. The evening ended with us eating some of Buffalo’s finest tacos. and then early to bed for me so that I could get up for an ASMP breakfast.

Heres some links that I cultivated over the weekend for you.

Luke Copping - Walking away

• The phone call is a dying art in some circles, but its still one oft he finest marketing tools around. Leslie Burns thinks so too. and her opinion is one I trust.

• Clever use of Google AdWords nets a creative a wish list job.

• Richard Branson, long touted for being a publicity hounds, says that entrepreneurs need to build for the future, and that  sometimes showy projects and stunts can be calculated experiments in disguise, not grabs for the headlines. Here are his five tips to running a successful business.

• From Ryan Freitas – 35 Lessons in 35 years

• Take your freelancing to the next level. become a thought leader and exercise some smart control and influence over your fans.

Erin McPartlan

Quick Cuts – Vaunt

Vaunt

Vaunt was in town briefly for a shoot with Auxiliary Magazine. I was glad to have a chance, albeit in an extremely limited window of time, to work with her in the few scant minutes of light we had left. It was a simple casual and fun shoot which resulted in a very rewarding image.

Required Reading

• Jake Garn discusses the importance of falling in love with what you do

• For all the up and coming photographers out there. I cannot suggest strongly enough that you pick up Leslie Burns new book Business Basics for the Successful Commercial Photographer

Tim Ferris discusses Seth Godin’s move away from traditional publishing. While mainly aimed at writers it is an interesting discussion on the evolution of new media channels. And I certainly think there are lessons that can be learned in this article by photographers and other creatives.

• My friend Meagan Hendrickson, the fashion editor of Auxiliary Magazine, loves Elvis. So much so that on the anniversary of Elvis’ death earlier this month she ran a blog piece on the necessity of Elvis’ glasses as an important fashion accessory. …. staring me.

• Justin Colt’s East/West Cross Country project is a must see.

• Drowned in Sound has this great Mixcloud up right now, 25 Tracks: A Dubstep Chronology. Simply my favorite new soundtrack in the studio and when doing post work. Check out some of the sounds below, but make sure to stop by Drowned in Sound and read the excellent analysis of this mix.

• I Found this Via Gala Darling’s site, and it is an interesting read. I have been a lifelong insomniac, sleeping very little most nights, a lot of these tips have been around for quite some time and work with marginal effectiveness, but I’m intrigued by tailoring my diet to include more sleep inducing foods. I’ll be looking into this notion more as the weeks go by. Especially since I seem to be having a tougher time than normal sleeping

• ASMP – Strictly Business – A New Path

A Dozen Pink Baloons – Quick Cuts

Nick Butlak Photographed by Luke Copping

I have been continuing my collaboration with artist Nick Butlak that we stared on a few months ago. This collection of images is from our second session shooting together, its comprised of the some shots taken in a more natural setting but still juxtaposed against his use of man made and artificial materials combined with strong, candy tinted colors. The balloons on this shoot were a force to be reckoned with. It was a slightly more windy day than we had anticipated, and by slightly more windy, I meant that Nick was being dragged too and from by the balloons for the duration of the shoot. Even I was getting knocked around by them. We learned to be very conscious of the wind direction very quickly.

Nick Butlak Photographed by Luke Copping

Other than the wind though, we were lucky to have absolutely gorgeous light and scenery on that afternoon to serve as a backdrop for Nick. These images will be for a number of promotional purposes and as part of the modeling/performance side of Nick’s artistic endeavors.

Nick Butlak Photographed by Luke Copping

A Busy Week

Its been a hectic week here, just got back from a couple hard days on a set. But I’ve got a chance to catch up on a lot of new work that still needs to go through post production. Keep an eye out for new promo images of artist Nick Butlak that are coming shortly. Some new tutorials, and more news on a bunch of upcoming projects that are starting next week.

lo-fi irregulars – Niagara Falls Blvd

After moving from Canada to the states when I was a kid I spent most of my life growing up around the Niagara Falls and Youngstown NY  areas. I have a strange obsession with the remains of the once great tourism industry that once kept the area moving, Some of the last relics of that previous tourist boom are the motels that line the boulevard. I was out there this morning and had a chance to play with Hipstamatic on my iPhone for a bit, taking shots of some of the signs and surrounding areas.

Images of the Niagara Falls Blvd Strip. By Luke Copping

The Bit-O-Paris motel, rooms still rented by high school kids to this day in order to throw parties.

Rapids Bowling centre - Luke Copping Photography

Rapids Bowling, I remember when I lived in the area, that there was always an unusually high concentration of bowling alleys nearby.

Bel-Aire motel - Luke Copping photography

The Bel-Aire motel, my favorite retro sign on the Boulevard.

motel and used cars - Luke Copping Photography

I would venture to say that its a bad idea to buy a used car from the motel you stayed at last night.

The Niagara Falls Motel - Luke Copping Photography

The Niagara Falls Motel

Motel in Niagara Falls NY - Luke Copping Photography

Another roadway motel

Knights Inn - Luke Copping Photography

Knights Inn, one of the more modern additions. Lacking some of the retro charm, but I still love that sign.

Caravan Motel, Niagara Falls - Luke Copping Photography

Another of my favorite sings from the area, the Caravan Motel.

The wagon wheel restaurant - Luke Copping photography

Front of the Wagon Wheel Restaurant

3 star motel - Luke Copping Photography

The 3-Star Motel

Old Bell Facility, Derelict Garage - Luke Copping Photography

A derelict garage at the Old Bell Aerospace Complex, Now a facility housing several manufacturing companies, I worked in the complex for years.

View of airfield and Garage - Bell Facility - Luke Copping Photography

Another view of the Garage and unused lots nearby.

To see more of Luke’s commercial and editorial photography work please visit lukecopping.com

Behind the Scenes: Ties and Glasses for Auxiliary Magazine

Selection of Ties from Cyberoptix Tie Labs

A range of ties provided by the wonderful Bethany Shorb of Cyberoptix Tie Labs, I plan on getting a few of these designs for myself. I’m a little bit in love with the chartreuse and pink lotus tie.

Lauren Mentkowski getting hair done

Our wonderful model; Lauren. Who was a savior on this particular shoot.

April Grigajtis

Hairstylist April Grigajtis will blow you away.

Lauren on set

Lauren Getting her final styling right before stepping in front of the lens.

Molly and Zach

Molly and Zach – Masters of interpretive dance.

The Archive of Embarrassment – I Have the Same Hairline Now

The Archive of Embarrassment is a collection of outtakes, personal photos, light tests, and self portraits that amuse me, mainly because they are a terrible and hillarious embarrassment for me or the people in them.

Photographer Luke Copping as a child

1. This chair makes an appearance in several shots of me 2. I look like The Leader from The Incredible Hulk 3. Did someone cut my hair this way? or was a losing it at a young age

The Archive of Embarrassment – Prince Valiant Rides Again

The Archive of Embarrassment is a collection of outtakes, personal photos, light tests, and self portraits that amuse me, mainly because they are a terrible and hillarious embarrassment for me or the people in them.

Downtime on a production a couple months ago. Hairstylist extraordinaire Linh Nguyen had this wig ready to go for a shot later in the day. Some might say it looks a little TOO good on me.