Ways to Make A Mess

Off the plane from all the color and noise of Vegas and right into the studio for this beauty assignment – Clouds of pigment were flying during a fun session that found my subjects Holli and Hillary covered in color by the time they left – Holli liked the result so much that she decided to wear it home after the production wrapped.

Maybe it is all the bright lights and neon of Vegas having an affect on me, but I want to drown myself in color lately.

  Hillary Snyder with colorful face  

Models: Holli Arnold + Hillary Snyder

Makeup: Nicole Barry

First Shoot in the New Studio – Marie Vaccarello

Marie Vaccarello wearing a black lace dress by Thomas Lee

Marie Vaccarello wearing a black lace dress by Thomas LeeBlog Header

I am excited and proud to share with you images from the first production to take place at my new studio. Fittingly it involved my long time collaborator, über rockstar model Marie Vaccarello, and the wonderfully talented Andrea Lossecco taking care of the styling. I am loving being in the new space and being able to create spontaneous works like this again. It’s nice to finally be settled into and working in the space we spent so long rehabillitating.

Marie Vaccarello photographer by Luke Copping at Victory StudiosMarie Vaccarello in Black Lace Dress by Thomas Lee.

 

Quick Questions With Smart People – Sean Armenta: Photographer

Sean Armenta is a beauty and fashion photographer from the Los Angeles area. His formidable client list includes Paul Mitchell, Wet Seal, Arden B, and Paul Frank to name a few. He has also been featured in numerous publications including Flaunt, InStyle, Vibra, Elle Germany, Sphere, and Want. Sean has a wonderful reputation on the web amongst fellow photographers, especially for his willingness to help other shooters, share advice, and answer technical questions. In addition to his active shooting schedule,  Sean regularly teaches his Prep to Post beauty photography workshops all over the country.

LC: Sean, in terms of marketing ones work,  especially within the beauty and fashion markets, what have been some of the more effective marketing techniques for you in communicating your work and point of view to your clients? What is a good starting point for those emerging photographers who are taking their first steps in getting their work in front of potential clients?

SA: I think above all your work should speak for itself and about yourself. Your work should be relevant to the industry you are trying to work in, and current to our time without being gimmicky and overly trendy. You need to keep an eye on what’s going on out there by seeing who is shooting what and why. Who is shooting a lot of covers?  Who is shooting the top campaigns?  It is more often than not a small group of 5 or so photographers who are producing the bulk of the work. You have to be able to understand why they are the flavor of the week, month, or year. This will help you determine what the industry is looking for stylistically.

In producing your portfolio, quality over quantity is the best rule to go by.  You must be able to edit your work without any personal or emotional connection to it. Needless to say much thought needs to go into your final portfolio that you will be showing potential clients, everything from layout to packaging must be considered. You must also do research on the clientele you are targeting. Is the work you are presenting relevant to their product and something their Art Buyers are looking to use?  If I am meeting with a new client, I will specifically create a customized portfolio just for them. Why would I show 20 fashion images to a cosmetics company?

When it comes to your online presence, simple really is best. You want YOUR work to stand out, not the design of your website.  It must be easy to navigate, clean and straightforward. People don’t want to spend half an hour trying to figure out how to get to your images. It does help to categorize your images into, say, Fashion, Beauty, Lifestyle, Still Life, etc.  It does not help you however, to be a jack of all trades. Having one website that encompasses everything from Weddings to Fashion to Automotive to Table Top photography only shows your client that you do not know what it is you really want to shoot. Clients want to know you are great at what they specifically need, not decent at all types of photography.

Blogs are a great way to show clients your personality and to keep them updated about your growth as an artist. Keep it professional but allow your personality to shine through. Post something about all your shoots, meetings, etc. People like to know what you are doing to advance your career.

I’m no marketing genius by any means – in fact most of my clients were acquired through word of mouth; clients referring me to other clients. The most important thing I have learned is this: Someone else talking about you is always better than you talking about yourself because it gives you validity.

LC: So many emerging photographers fall into the trap of letting their clients undervalue their work, or even worse, undervaluing their own work. How important is it for them to present their work as worthwhile and valuable to their clients? How can they not fall into the trap of letting their fears of success or failure stop them from even trying?

SA: I
just had a meeting last week with a global cosmetics company. After doing my presentation they asked what my rate would be for the campaign, so I handed them a written estimate. The long awkward silence that followed told me that my quote was above what they were prepared to pay. The VP of marketing said something I have never heard a client say, and is usually what we say to clients. She said, “This quote is outside of what our budget is, but seeing your work I understand why it is this rate. You get what you pay for, and we must be doing something wrong because we have been dissatisfied with our marketing materials.”

Never ever sell yourself short. Lowballing only shows desperation and undervalues your work. Show clients a quality of work that will elevate their brand.  Present yourself in a confident and professional manner. Show passion for what it is you do. Do research on the clients you are trying to reach out to, find out what their marketing needs are, and see what you can do to meet their needs. Photographs are the most important aspect of marketing.  It is what consumers see first and what they relate to. Photographs make people buy products.

LC: You are known for working with a reliable core support team, how important is it for photographers just  starting out to build the kind of relationships with stylists, producers, and assistants that will surround them with a team that cares as much about the final outcome of the production as a whole? What are good places from these photographers to start finding talented team members to work with.

SA: Building a core team of artists (Hair, Makeup, Styling, etc) is all important in our industry, especially during your developmental stage as a photographer. I believe that fashion and beauty photography is very much a collaborative environment. You are only as good as the people you work with. One of the most important things I learned early on was to seek out artists that were at a level above my own, and through working with those people I learned so much about the industry, and their experience elevated my work. I think we should always be in a constant state of learning, as this is the only way to grow as an artist. Team building is a huge part of what I teach at my workshops because casting the right crew is what makes or breaks the success of a shoot. I think we need to return to a sense of community with each other, and this is really the best way to seek out people to work with. Ask your peers for referrals of who they like to work with. Strive to produce the kind of work that will make other artists want to work with you.

LC: Looking back on your own career, do you remember any mistakes or lessons that you had to learn early on? If you had to guide another photographer though them in the simplest terms; what would be your top three do’s and dont’s you have learned throughout your career?

SA: I think it’s so important to be genuinely nice to everyone. No one wants to work with an asshole no matter how great their work may be. Be the person people want to work with and be around and treat people the way you would like to be treated.

DO
Take a business and marketing class
Save your money and do not rack up debt
Keep your overhead as low as possible


DON’T
Don’t sell yourself short
Don’t be afraid to take risks with your work
Don’t get comfortable with your current situation

LC: How important is it to strike a balance between ones own vision and taste and between creating a consistent and marketable visual style? should photographers be letting editors and buyers dictate their style to a great degree, or should they actively be going after the clients who they think are right for them and their preexisting look?

SA: While it is very important to be able to show your own vision while staying marketable, during the beginning of your career it is not as important as showing you are able to deliver what the client wants. I think too much emphasis is put on developing one’s own “signature style” too early in their career and they become a one-trick pony. Your work will eventually be identifiable to you because of your approach to your subject, not because of a specific “look” created by a certain lighting setup or post production effect. That, to me, is gimmicky and trendy. Don’t fall into the trap of forcing yourself to create your style which will only limit your growth as an artist and show clients your lack of versatility and flexibility.

I don’t think we should be letting editors or buyers dictate our style per se, but what you have to understand is that talent and skill only gets our foot in the door. At the end of the day we still need to deliver the needs of the client. With that said, of course we ought to seek those clients whose image matches the style of work we produce and whom we are most passionate about working with.

Aesthetic

I recently had the chance to work with model Kerry Quaile for a new regular column I am both creating imagery for and writing in Auxiliary Magazine. The new regular contribution, called Aesthetic, is a breakdown of the hybridization of various counter culture styles with the aesthetics and mindfulness of well styled fashion and beauty editorials. It is an attempt to break these subculture style trappings out of their own stereotypes in order to create something new and impressive. Its been a pleasure to be working on this new column as Auxiliary has given me a great deal of creative control to work with my stylists and various fashion figures in trying to predict these new hybrid styles based on trends in both the alternative and mainstream fashion industries.  This installment of Aesthetic, featuring Kerry Quaile and Lauren Mentkowski is featured in the April issue of Auxiliary, and the first installment Metropolis Androgyne, ran in the February issue.

Auxiliary Magazine Teaser Video

A short behind the scenes preview at a shoot I recently worked on for Auxiliary Magazine’s february issue. I have discovered that my Kinoflos do great double duty in terms of lighting both still and motion pieces, and were used extensively on both aspects of this project.

Auxiliary Magazine Shoot – Preview Video from Luke Copping on Vimeo.

Free Writing and Spontaneous Photography

In writing there is a structured exercise that is often undertaken to help writers develop ideas or to overcome blocks, it is called free writing. Based on a series of basic guidelines it allows an author to write freely, in a stream of consciousness style, without any regard to form, grammar, or topic. This action allows the writer to create raw output absent of self criticism or over conceptualization. Whether the end material is usable or not, the process serves multiple purposes. First, it allows the writer to build momentum, the actual act of writing can serve to exorcise a block that may prevent one from writing in a formal method. Secondly, it allows a cathartic purging of the half formed ideas that may prevent the writer from focusing on more urgent ideas or formal projects. Finally, in some free writing sessions it allows the writer to develop and record seed ideas that may later become fully formed concepts.

Jessica

During a slow night I found myself with the itch to just pick up my camera and shoot… anything. I decided to call up my friend Jessica and have her drop by the studio for an impromptu session, we were walking into this with no expectations regarding the final product, it was simply taking pictures for the sake of taking pictures. There had been no discussions of concept, wardrobe, styling, lighting, or mood, all we knew was that Jessica would bring bags of clothing, and also that she would be bringing her pet rat. All other decisions would have to be made on the spot, in the limited amount of time that we had available.

From her pile of wardrobe and accessories, a decision of styling was made on the spot, we would attempt to create two looks with radically different styling and moods in just under 2.5 hours, thankfully Jessica is a talented stylist and was able to take care of hair and makeup with no problem. Concepts were quickly decided by choosing the first two that came to mind, we would do something vaguely inspired by Louise Brooks, a 1920’s silent film star, which involved Jessica cutting and styling a wig on the spot, as well as a warmer image using her own candy colored red hair. The entire process was put together quickly and on the fly, and the concepts were only loosely adhered too in terms of execution and final look, each look evolved and changed throughout the shooting session.

JJ20091020-32-Edit

It was an interesting change from my normal workflow, which usually involves hours of script development, styling choices, scouting, casting, wardrobe, lighting etc.. What is normally a very structured process for me became very loose and intuitive by necessity of the parameters I had to work within. It was a beneficial experience that led to the development of a few other concepts that I’ll probably revisit in later projects, as well a chance to experiment in a situation with no expectations or pressure of self criticism. The rules of free writing can be  tweaked for a more visual medium like photography with some of the suggestions below.

Limit yourself to a specific window of time

All decisions must be made within this time frame, not outside of it

Subject does not matter

There are no bad ideas

Attempt more than one concept

Concepts should evolve organically as the shoot progresses

Team size is irrelevant

Experiment both technically and creatively

If you find yourself with nothing to photograph, photograph anything